13 Day Best of Egypt Tour with Nile Cruise

At last my dream has been achieved. I have always wanted to visit Egypt since I was 20 years old. 30 years of waiting. I went! I took my middle daughter, Jenna with me for a two weeks trip. We left Sydney on 9th of November and got back home on 21st of November.

13 day Best of Egypt tour with Nile cruise.

There is no place like Egypt. Float down the famed waters of the Nile River, on-board a luxury cruise ship and traditional felucca. Shock the senses with the sights, smells and sounds of the bustling streets in Cairo, and gaze up in amazement at the graceful Great Sphinx of Giza. Turn your attention across the landscape to the equally breath-taking pyramids, the old-world structures that have stood for thousands of years.

The adventure into Egypt’s history continues at The Egyptian Museum and the Valley of Kings. Travel from Cairo to Luxor aboard an overnight sleeper train. Wander through the maze of stalls of Nubian Bazaar in Aswan and delve into the part Egypt played in World War II at El Alamein.

Thats the blurb from the WebJet website.

https://exclusives.webjet.com.au/deals/cruise-deals/egypt/13-day-best-of-egypt-tour-with-nile-cruise-flights/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7OHbveCD3wIVko6PCh1gxACgEAAYASAAEgKnR_D_BwE#_

 

The detailed itinerary is as follows;

 

 

 

 

 

Day 1: Australia –– Cairo

Depart Australia for Egypt.

Day 2: Cairo

Welcome to Cairo, the frenetic Egyptian capital. Arrive at Cairo International Airport (CAI) and be transferred to your hotel. Once you have checked in to the hotel (rooms are usually available after midday), the rest of the afternoon is at leisure. Gather at the hotel at 6pm for a welcome meeting and to say hello to fellow travellers. The details for this meeting can be confirmed at hotel reception. Hotel: Mercure Le Sphinx

Day 3: Cairo  Luxor (B,D)

This morning after breakfast, the tour drives out to Giza for an up-close encounter with two of Egypt’s most iconic landmarks: the Pyramids of Giza and the Great Sphinx of Giza. These remarkable structures are unlike anything else in the world and travellers may venture inside the Great Pyramid of Khufu (or Cheops) for an additional fee. See more of Egypt’s ancient treasures and artefacts at the Egyptian Museum, accompanied by an expert guide. There is then some free time before returning to the hotel in the afternoon and taking a transfer to the railway station, ready to board the overnight sleeper train to Luxor.

Accommodation aboard the overnight train comprises a two-berth cabin that is converted to bunk beds. All bedding is provided, and Western-style toilets are in each carriage. Bags are stored in the cabin, and airline-style dinner and breakfasts are also served in-cabin. Those with dietary or snack requirements may think about bringing their own meals. This can be discussed with the tour leader.

Day 4: Luxor – Embark on Nile Cruise (B,L,D) 

An early breakfast on-board before the train rolls into Luxor. This vibrant city is home to an energetic bazaar and is also located conveniently close to some of ancient Egypt’s most important sites. Travel to Karnak to see the celebrated temple complexes. These structures were built across a period of 200 years and areas date back to 2055BC. A guided tour of the temples is as educational as it is fascinating. Later in the day, there is a transfer to the Nile cruise boat, your home for the next 4 nights. Relax by the boat’s on-board pool or keep exploring Luxor at your own pace. The remainder of the afternoon and evening is free time.

Day 5: Valley of the Kings, Edfu (B,L,D) 

Rise early to head into the Valley of the Kings. There are more than 60 pharaoh tombs buried beneath the hills here, and many are lavishly decorated with relics and paintings. Perhaps the Valley’s most high-profile resident is Tutankhamun; his final resting place is here. The day is led by an expert guide, who will give background on hieroglyphics and the funerary rites and traditions of ancient Egyptians. Among the other sights for today’s itinerary are three royal tombs, the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut and the Colossi of Memnon. Return to the boat for lunch and to relax as the cruise begins its sail for Edfu. This journey is typically from 1pm to 11pm, however it may be slowed by river traffic and the number of other boats passing through Esna Lock.

Day 6: Edfu, Kom Ombo, Aswan (B,L,D) 

Wake in the morning to find the cruise moored at Edfu, a beautifully preserved temple dedicated to Horus. The voyage upriver continues, and travellers can watch scenery pass by from the boat deck. Reach Kom Ombo temple, about 45 kilometres north of Aswan, in the afternoon. The temple is an insight into the Greco-Roman influence of the area and is dedicated to two gods: Horus, god of protection; and Sobek, the god of crocodiles. There is also a crocodile museum attached to the temple. Return to the boat around 6pm to continue the cruise to Aswan, arriving about 9.30pm.

Day 7: Aswan (B,L,D) 

A free day to explore Aswan. Meander along the waterfront promenade, known locally as the ‘corniche’, and stop for a mid-walk mint tea. Time your stroll for dusk when the area comes alive with families socialising and relaxing.

Day 8: Aswan – Abu Simbel – Aswan (B)

Disembark from the cruise in the morning and then board a coach for the drive to Abu Simbel. Here, travellers may recognise the four colossus statues of Ramses guarding the Great Temple. This afternoon, board a traditional felucca for a sailboat trip around the neighbouring islands, stopping off at the botanical gardens on Kitchener’s Island. The rest of the day is leisure. One option is to seek out St. Simeon, an abandoned 7th century fortress monastery located in the desert on the Nile’s west bank. The tour leader is on hand to help arrange activities.

Day 9: Aswan –– Cairo (B)

A transfer to Aswan airport after breakfast, followed by a short flight to Cairo. Be transferred to the hotel and then visit Cairo’s oldest souk, Khan al-Khalili Bazaar. The souk fans out in an area known as Al-Azhar. Its stalls sell everything from gold and perfume, to spices and textiles.

Day 10: Cairo – Alexandria (B)

Follow the desert road leading from Cairo to Alexandria, a large port city that sits on the Mediterranean coastline. An orientation walk with the tour leader is a great introduction to the city. Learn about the city’s origins as an homage to Alexander the Great, and its place as a cultural, political, economic and intellectual centre. Take a walk along the corniche, or head underground to explore the Kom ash-Shuqqafa catacombs. Any free time can be spent seeing the Citadel of Qaitbay, a defensive fortress overlooking the ocean that now sits where the famous Alexandria Lighthouse once stood.

Day 11: Alexandria – El Alamin – Cairo (B,L)

From ancient Egypt to more recent chapters in the country’s history; today’s itinerary includes an excursion to sites around El Alamein and the war museum located there. Now a resort town, El Alamein played a crucial role in significant World War II battles and the events here are considered a turning point in the North African campaign. There are several memorials in the area, plus a war cemetery. The group returns to Cairo after this stop.

Day 12: Cairo –– Australia (B)

There is free time after breakfast and airport transfers are made at the appropriate time.

Day 13: Australia

Arrive home today.

Posted in Holiday | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

AEDT?

AEDT = Australian Eastern Daylight Savings Time which is 11 hours ahead of GMT (Greenwich Mean Time)

Posted in Bits n Pieces, Education | Leave a comment

Family Tree Research – Taree December 2016

I took my mighty black corolla up to Taree for two nights from 11th December to 13th December (Sunday to Tuesday) 2016. Three goals; research my family history, secondly visit the Ellenborough Falls and finally see my parents and my sister and her family.

Sunday 11th December

On Sunday, it took me 3.5 hours to get to Taree. I visited my campsite, Twilight Caravan Park at 146 Manning River Drive, Taree South and then I visited CundleTown Historical Society from 3pm. I worked with a lovely lady, Pat. She was able to give me copies of Council records of my Parkers and McKinnons.

www.cundletownhistorical.com

In the night, I went to see my parents and my sister and their kids for dinner at Diamond Beach.

Monday 12th December

On Monday, I went to Manning Wallamba Family History Society from 10am until 12. It was a wonderful event with two lovely people, Gloria and X.

www.manningwallambafhs.com.au

James and Catherine Parker farm at Glenthorne

Ellenborough Falls

 

 

In the night, I went to see my parents and my sister and their kids for dinner at a Tavern not far from Diamond Beach. I had fish and chips. Yummy dinner!

Tuesday 13th December

On Tuesday,  I went to Manning Historical Society at Wingham and I worked with a lovely researcher, Kaye. I looked at Parker timelines – there are two Parker families in Taree in the late 1800s. The first family (my heritage) is from Purfleet and the other family is from Marlee. I also looked into McDonalds (my Euphemia McKinnon comes from Neil Mc Kinnon and Flora McDonald).

What was interesting about this Dena lady. Her original name is Murdena Harding (nee Parker). Her dad was Murdoch Parker who was a business man and a Mayor of Taree in the 1920s.

www.manninghistorical.org

Posted in Genealogy, Holiday | 2 Comments

Simon Monk

Simon Monk has written some great Arduino based books.

I like his Programing Arduino, Next Steps. Going Further with Sketches book. TAB the publisher. I have this book.
http://simonmonk.org/?page_id=370

I plan to buy this Fritzing for Inventors book again by Simon Monk.
http://simonmonk.org/?page_id=736

References
http://simonmonk.org

Posted in Computers and hardware | Leave a comment

Regular Expressions and Python

Python is a great scripting language. www.python.org

Al Sweigart wrote great Python books;
Automate the boring tasks with Python
https://automatetheboringstuff.com/

Read his books online or buy his books. I have all of his books!
http://inventwithpython.com/

Regular expressions allow you to specify patterns of text to search for.
www.regular-expressions.info is a good resource.

Happy coding.

Posted in Computers and hardware, Education | Leave a comment

Expectancy effect

People have reported seeing a face on Mars, or Elvis in the form of a tree, or even seeing the Virgin Mary in a toasted cheese sandwich.

This sort of expectancy effect is really common throughout cognition, and psychology, more generally.

Example
A manager tells subordinate that they are good at analysis but bad at interpersonal influence. The person’s analysis results improve but their relationships with others deteriorates.

So What?
To get someone to behave in a certain way, first believe that they are capable of doing this and then communicate your expectation to the other person.

Defending
When people expect you to fail, reject this and set your own expectations.

http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/interpersonal_expectancy.htm

Posted in Philosophy | Leave a comment

The method used to fall asleep in just one minute

Simply breathe in for four seconds, hold the breath for seven seconds and exhale completely to a count of eight. It only takes a few seconds and Weil suggests repeating the technique up to four times.

“This exercise is a natural tranquiliser for the nervous system,” Dr Weil says. “Unlike tranquilising drugs, which are often effective when you first take them but then lose their power over time, this exercise is subtle when you first try it but gains in power with repetition and practice. Do it at least twice a day. You cannot do it too frequently.”

Some users have said the technique helps them fall asleep within one minute.

It can help users relax and fall asleep, but breathing deeply and the knock-on effect this has on our nervous system offers plenty of other benefits too.

“The ability to breathe so deeply and powerfully is not limited to a select few. This skill is inborn but often lies dormant,” Harvard medical school points out. “Reawakening it allows you to tap one of your body’s strongest self-healing mechanisms.”

It improves our immune system, blood pressure, overall physical health and even helps us burn fat more effectively.

http://www.dailylife.com.au/health-and-fitness/dl-wellbeing/the-method-used-to-fall-asleep-in-just-one-minute-20150601-ghe1lp.html

Posted in Education, Environment, Home Life, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

DesignSpark PCB

DesignSpark PCB is a free of charge PCB design tool!

“DesignSpark PCB is the world’s most accessible electronics design software. Easy to easy to learn and easy to use, DesignSpark PCB is designed to significantly reduce your concept-to-production time.

At the core of this unique approach is a powerful software engine that enables you to capture Schematics, design PCB boards and layouts. DesignSpark PCB had won multiple awards and with over 250,000 registered users it emerges as an electronic industry’s standard for collaboration and file sharing!”

http://www.rs-online.com/designspark/electronics/eng/page/designspark-pcb-home-page

Posted in Computers and hardware, Electronics | Leave a comment

Becoming minimalist: “Happiness is not a destination, it’s a way of life.”

9 Common Pursuits That Rob Us of Happiness

finding-happiness

“Happiness is not a destination, it’s a way of life.”

Happiness. We look for it in different places. Some of us hope to buy it. Some think we can earn it. Others look for it in a new job, a new relationship, or a new accomplishment.

But one thing remains: happiness is something we all desire. We were designed to experience it.

Why then, does it appear at times to be so elusive? How can a society search so desperately for something, but still struggle to find it?

Maybe it is because the pursuits we have set before us as a means to find it are actually keeping us from it.

Consider these 9 pursuits and how they may be distracting us from happiness. Each of them are common in our lives and in our world. But  rather than contributing to our happiness, they may be robbing us of it.

9 Common Pursuits That Rob Us of Happiness

1. Following the crowd. The crowd rarely has our best interests in mind. Instead, they seek their own benefit. Scientists call this crowd mentality. And more often than not, following the crowd leads to destructive behaviors rather than life-giving. We would be wise to seek input into our lives from other sources than the popular perceptions of the day.

2. Trying to please everybody. Bill Cosby said it this way, “I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.” We are never going to please everybody. At some point, we will hold an unpopular opinion—one that gives us meaning and purpose and passion. And when we do, we ought to hold on to it desperately.

3. Chasing wealth. Studies confirm it over and over again: once our most basic needs have been met, money contributes very little to our overall happiness. And yet, we continue to pursue more as if it holds the secret key to lasting joy. But those who desire riches bring temptation to themselves and are often caught in a trap. Happiness is never the byproduct of chasing wealth.

4. Desiring a picture-perfect life. Happiness is not something we discover only after everything is perfect with our lives (our jobs, our appearance, our relationships). If that were the case, none of us would ever experience happiness. This world is imperfect—always will be. But happiness can still be found once we realize perfection is not a prerequisite.

5. Building our own kingdom. The size of our universe shrinks dramatically when we place ourselves at the center. Living selfishly for our own personal gain will never produce lasting happiness and fulfillment. Our lives are designed to be lived for something far greater. And only those who discover the hidden joy of living for others will find a happiness that truly lasts.

6. Entertaining distraction. Our world has become a constant feed of information, noise, and entertainment. Each distraction enters our mind with one goal: Gain control of our attention and resources. Those who sacrifice their resources to unlimited curiosity will never find the mental or financial capacity to become something greater.

7. Fighting for recognition. Searching for happiness in recognition is a losing endeavor. The world will never give you the respect or accolades you so desperately desire. They are all too busy fighting for their own. You will need to find it elsewhere.

8. Succumbing to fear. If given the chance, fear will always cripple. It will steal your life and potential. Living your fullest life will require courage in the face of fear. Sometimes you will fail. But be strong, most of the time, you will succeed—or become better because of it.

9. Searching for it around the next corner. Happiness is not something to be chased. It is a decision to be made.

And you have everything you need right now to choose it.

 

No I did not write this article but it was so good that I copied the text in entirety. I acknowledge the source –  http://www.becomingminimalist.com/find-happiness/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+becomingminimalistcom+%28becomingminimalist.com%29

Posted in Philosophy | Leave a comment

Speccy

Speccy is an advanced System Information tool for your PC. Speccy a freebie will give you all the PC information you need. Its a great little program.

http://www.piriform.com/speccy

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment